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Thread: Daily Dump for Tuesday, April 16th, 2013

  1. #21
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    It took less than 5 minutes for Obama to do the scripted:

    "We will remain vigilant."

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    Resilient.

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    Boy, 8, killed in Boston Marathon attack reportedly had an ice cream seconds before blast


    An 8-year-old boy who just had an ice cream was killed Tuesday in one of the explosions at the end of the Boston Marathon as he joined his family in cheering runners completing the 26.2-mile race.


    Martin Richard, the boy, was with his father, mother and 6-year-old sister near the grandstand when one of the explosions occurred. The mother and sister were both critically injured in the blast. Martin's mother underwent brain surgery Monday night and his sister, 6, lost a leg in the blast, WHDH.com reported. The status of his father, William, has not been released publicly.


    The family had gone to get ice cream, then returned to the area near the finish line. Neighbor Jack Cunningham said Martin's father was a runner but had been injured and didn't run the marathon.


    "They were looking in the crowd as the runners were coming to see if they could identify some of their friends when the bomb hit," Lynch said. He described the family as very strong and said they were doing better than might be expected.


    The children's father is the director of a local community group. The mother works at the Neighborhood House Charter School, where her children attend classes, MyFoxBoston.com reported.


    A candle was burning on the stoop of the family's home in the city's Dorchester section Tuesday, and the word ‘Peace’ was written in chalk on the front walkway.


    At least nine children were among the injured, according to law enforcement officials. Hospitals reported at least 176 people injured, at least 17 of them critically. At least eight children were being treated at hospitals.


    On Tuesday morning, candle burned on the stoop of the family's single-family home in the city's Dorchester section, and "peace" was written in chalk on the front walkway. A child's bicycle helmet lay overturned on the front lawn.


    "What a gift. To know him was to love him," said longtime friend Judy Tuttle, who remembered sitting at the dining room table having tea with Denise Richard while Martin did his homework. "He had that million-dollar smile and you never knew what was going to come out of him. Denise is the most spectacular mother that you've ever met and Bill is a pillar of the community. It doesn't get any better than these people."


    Neighbor Jane Sherman said Martin was a typical 8-year-old who loved to ride his bike and play baseball, according to The Boston Channel.


    "There are no words to describe how they are feeling ... we are feeling," Sherman said, adding that the Richards are a close-knit family.
    Neighbor Betty Delorey, 80, said Martin loved to climb the neighborhood trees and hop the fence outside his home.


    "I can just remember his mother calling him, `Martin!' if he was doing something wrong," she said. "Just a vivacious little kid."


    Delorey had a photo showing Martin dressed as the character Woody from the Toy Story films, wearing a cowboy hat, a sheriff's badge, jeans and a big smile. His sister, Jane, was at his right dressed as Woody's friend, Jesse. Their older brother, Henry, was to their left, dressed as Harry Potter.


    "I'm sick to my stomach," she said. "It's hard to say anything really."


    The children's father, William, is the director of a local community group, and an avid runner and bicyclist.


    Denise Richard works as a librarian at the Neighborhood House Charter School, where Martin was a third-grader and Jane attends first grade.
    Counselors were being made available Tuesday to staff and students, said Bodi Luse, a school spokeswoman.


    "We are devastated," she said. "The whole community is devastated."


    Cunningham remembered running in a community 5K race with the Richard family on a rainy day years ago. He said Martin would jump out of a stroller that his mother was pushing to hop in the mud puddles along the route.


    "I just can't get a handle on it," he said of the boy's death. "In an instant, life changes."

  4. #24
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    The pursuit of liberty is a marathon


    Nothing will be quite the same in Boston or in America after Monday's terrorist attack. Psychologically, the bombings bring terrorism to the streets of an American city, on a sunny Patriot's Day, during a road race, the Boston Marathon.


    The bombings mean that any street corner, in any American City, is vulnerable -- that terror need not come from the sky, nor target iconic skyscrapers and national landmarks. It can target people where they gather just for fun, on any given day.


    The attacker or attackers today used bombs in backpacks, not commandeered jets. They chose the streets of Boston, not the Capitol Building in Washington, D.C., or the World Trade Center in New York City as their target. Because the target of those who hate freedom is anyone who loves it, anywhere, anytime.


    Here is the irony: We are vulnerable, because we are free and strong.


    On Monday, Boston and America joined cities like Jerusalem and nations like Ireland, which have long known that safety is relative, that the danger that comes from asserting the values we hold dear is omnipresent, that life itself is a gift that can be taken not only by cancer and heart disease, but by the disease of terrorism.


    We are no more vulnerable today than yesterday, but we will feel more vulnerable, because we had no known hint of what was to befall us.
    This event will register, psychologically, in the minds of those at the Boston Garden and Madison Square Garden and at parades on Fifth Avenue in a way that only the carnage on 9/11 did -- and, possibly, even more.


    With all our TSA security, with the Homeland Security Act, with the government nosing around in our emails and deploying drones at home and abroad, with the (nonsensical) talk in Washington about banning assault rifles or restricting access to ammunition, an 8-year-old boy was blown up Monday, two adults were blown up on Monday, and more than a hundred others were injured, some losing limbs.


    Here is the irony: We are vulnerable, because we are free and strong. These qualities attract the ire of those who would have us shackled and weak, who are consumed by hatred for individual possibilities, rather than love for what a free person can dream about and strive for and accomplish.


    Please tell your children this: We are attacked in America because we speak about and believe in the power of people to guide themselves through life, to make their own decisions, to think their own thoughts, to speak freely and to pursue their own happiness.


    Tell them that as long as the Lincoln Memorial and the Jefferson Memorial and the Statue of Liberty grace our great land that those opposed to equality and freedom will always see us as enemies. Tell them that we must always be vigilant, but never afraid.


    Tell them that we cannot be defeated, because the truth wins, every time. And we, in America, hold great truths to be self-evident.
    Tell them that liberty is a marathon.

  5. #25
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    Hug a first responder. Those heroes have balls running towards explosions.
    Heroes don't throw a ball or kick a ball or sing for crowds of people. Heroes are created when an ordinary person steps up when help is needed.

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    Post Boston Marathon bombing looters stealing marathon jackets,while others are just feet away critically injured






  7. #27
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    Can you believe that shit?

  8. #28
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    Haven't seen any news on the forum about the roofing nails being in the bombs.

  9. #29
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    Boston Marathon heroes: Kindness and humanity amid the carnage

    Out of the horror of the Boston marathon bombings, there emerged uplifting examples of human kindness as the city's residents did all they could to help those caught up in the attack.


    One of the most shared messages on Twitter was a quote from American television host and Presbyterian minister Fred Rogers: "Look for the helpers. You'll always find people who are helping."


    And it proved to be true.


    So many of the runners continued to run across the finishing line and onwards to the Massachusetts General Hospital, in a rush to give blood, that they had to be turned away.


    "Due to the generosity of our donors we don't need blood at this time," wrote the Red Cross for Eastern Massachusetts on Twitter.


    But the volunteers kept on coming, leading the organisation to tweet an hour later: "We do *NOT* need blood at this time. Please schedule a future donation."


    So great was the wish to help that the Red Cross was forced to set up a diary to arrange appointments for all those queuing up to give blood.
    Others provided more immediate assistance. One man was caught on camera rushing straight to site where the bomb had detonated, where bloodied people were lying dazed on the pavement. He ripped off his belt to make a tourniquet and stem the bleeding, before turning to assist other seriously-injured victims.


    Luke Russert reported on Twitter that he watched as a white-shirted volunteer in his red official baseball cap wheeled a woman out of the danger zone before rushing immediately back to the scene.

    A retired American Football star, Joe Andruzzi, who won the Superbowl three times with the New England Patriots, carried victims away from the carnage (above). All three of his brothers were firemen in New York who responded to the September 11 attacks on the Twin Towers.


    His charity cancer foundation was hosting an event on Boylston Street – the same street where the explosions were detonated – and the 37-year-old immediately dashed to help.

    Other people opened their homes to those who were stranded, or offered lifts to people without transport. A Google document was set up with offers of help, such as: "Located across the street from Mass General Hospital. I have a couch and an inflatable twin mattress for anyone who needs to stay."


    Kristin Corona who lives in central Boston wrote: "I have a couch to offer and two beautiful chihuahuas to love you. My apartment is open to anyone in need."


    Restaurants in the area offered free meals and shelter to those caught up in the tragedy, allowing people to pay only if they were able to.
    "Open wifi, place to charge your phone, cold drinks, or just don't want to be alone," tweeted the owner of El Pelon, a Mexican restaurant in the area.


    "My coworkers and staff deserve a lot of credit: not one blinked when asked, not one when home when they could, those not working came in."

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